ARTICLES

Wartime Health

Posted 14th May 2017 by Maggie Clowes

Appleby was immensely proud of its Red House Hospital run by VADs for convalescent service men but who looked after the civilian population? A TOWN WITH NO HOSPITAL In 1914 Appleby had two doctors - Dr Andrew Sprott and Dr Harvey de Montmorency both of whom were based in Boroughgate. in addition there was the Sick Nursing Association which had been set up by Lady Hothfiel…

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DYNAMIC DUO

Posted 6th April 2017 by Maggie Clowes

Alderman and Mrs Heelis were responsible for two FIRSTS in Appleby. The first married couple to be made Freemen of the town while she was the first woman to be so honoured. Why? Already well known and respected locally, the Heelis family came up trumps in the first World War. Alderman Edward Heelis was Mayor throughout the war years, ably supported by his wife. His son we…

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WARTIME WORK OF APPLEBY’S MAYORESS RECOGNISED

Posted 8th February 2017 by Maggie Clowes

Mrs Ann Heelis was the first woman to be awarded the Freedom of Appleby in recognition of her work in the town in the first World War. Her husband was Mayor throughout the war and she gave him her whole-hearted support. It was well known that without her encouragement he could not have carried on. By the end of 1914 she had set up a working party to knit and sew comforts…

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THE WOMEN LEFT BEHIND

Posted 8th February 2017 by Maggie Clowes

By the end of 1915 129 men had joined up - few families were unaffected - husbands, sons, boy-friends, grandsons gone. There is next to no information in the scrapbooks about how families coped. They must have been constantly anxious, missing someone who was usually around, watching for the post, scanning newspaper reports, probably short of money. There would have been fea…

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EGGOGRAMS

Posted 10th January 2017 by Maggie Clowes

What ever was an Eggogram? Poultry World’s editor came up with the idea of collecting eggs for wounded soldiers. The aim in 1914 was to provide 20,000 newly-laid eggs a week to be sent to a hospital in France, but by Easter 1915 200,000 eggs had been collected in one week. In the following August, partly to celebrate the fact that Queen Alexandra had become the patron of…

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